STOP PRESS!!!

We have just been alerted that 200 trafficked chldren were found in transport in Bouake, Cote d’Ivoire heading for cocoa farms the night of 10th/11th July (the night before last)

The majority are apparently from neighbouring Burkina Faso; there is also talk that they are part of a convoy of 750 trafficked people but this isn’t confirmed.

Whilst we’re really happy that the Ivorian authorities have found these children; we have a few questions:

1.  Who is going to manage these children?

2.  Where will they be in the interim prior to being taken home?

3.  How did they cross the border?

Our own view is that they probably entered Cote d’Ivoire in small numbers with an adult as happens on the Ghanaian border so as to divert any suspiscicn.  This was discussed with an Ivorian lady in April who has a shop in Elubo and is aware of children crossing with an adult, usually up to 5 children at a time.

We hope that the situation for these 200 children will be resolved shortly & they can return home as quickly as possibly; however there’s always the worry they’ll be re-trafficked!

 

(An article was seen in Le Patriote & Nouveau Reveil 12/07/13 concerning this situation)

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Easter chocolate; your choice!

The supermarket shelves are stacked high with easter eggs already, four weeks before Easter Sunday!

Have you ever thought where many of these chocolate eggs originate from?

Comic Relief in the UK has ‘Red Nose Day’ approaching, prior to Easter; but we’ve yet to see a mention of child trafficking or assistance towards it.

We’re trying to build the centre to give long-term rehabilitation to the many children trafficked in West Africa, not just in cocoa plantations but also working as domestic servants and in prostitution.  Giving them the empowerment they deserve to lead normal adult lives, stopping the vicious circle of trafficking.

Could you help us reach our goal?

Could you help fundraise before Easter?

Could you circulate this post with your friends?

Thank you!

See more here: http://wp.me/p3aqBS-2K

Advocacy or Action?

It’s been mentioned before, there isn’t a centre in the sub-region of West Africa that solely caters for trafficked children.  Please search google; we cannot find much about what is happening to the trafficked children, but lots of advocacy about them.  Very little action.

Due to ‘M’ the little girl who was found on the beach; C.R.E.E.R was created as we recognised her needs and those of many children that have been trafficked into slavery.  They go to orphanages, who don’t have the specialist needs to cater for the emotional needs of the children.

Those are the lucky ones, others are living in the streets having escaped but lost as to where to call ‘home’ having travelled many miles with their trafficker.  Without money to return home, scared of adults who may return them to their lives of slavery; they live in the streets living on the scraps they can find.

We’ve always stuck by our claim that we’re the first residential centre offering rehabilitation, education and vocational skills  in West Africa to be created solely for trafficked children; until this week!

Cote d'Ivoire 4 Cocoa growers using trafficked children

A few days ago we came across another centre.  Not entirely the same but not entirely different.  During a phone call to their offices, there were a lot of similarities.  They cater for children from Lake Volta in Ghana who are trafficked to work in the fishing industry.  Most of the fish isn’t exported so there’s not so much advocacy about it as there is with cocoa production, domestic servitude or prostitution; where the majority of C.R.E.E.R’s future generation are expected to come from.

An incredible conversation, hearing very similar thoughts to what we’ve been dealing with:

1.  No one else has a centre in the region, they believe they are the first, although they are mainly working with children from the lake.  We are now the second in the West African sub-region.

2.  It took them over 18 months to obtain their land; they also experienced endless meetings, false promises and wild goose chases.

3.  Local traditions, culture, bureaucracy; they have experienced a lot in Ghana that we’ve experienced in Cote d’Ivoire (& are still experiencing!)

However, we no longer feel as if we’re scraping in the dark with a speck of light at the end of a long tunnel.  Their organisation is going from strength to strength; there are facets that we would like to introduce at C.R.E.E.R particularly their art therapy.

So, advocacy is all very well, but action is needed too.  We need more help to make our centre a reality & gain action from committed individuals to help fundraise!

Green building materials?

It all got rather exciting today.

We found a project for a floating school in Lagos in Nigeria http://ht.ly/hMEpg although this wouldn’t be ideal for land-based C.R.E.E.R it was the start of a trail.

It led to an orphanage in South Africa that has been built from shipping containers; which then incited a call to the architects in Johannesburg who assured us that even in a tropical climate; it is possible to keep containers cool.  They suggested looking up an architect, Adam Kalkin which initially led to this site:  http://www.residentialshippingcontainerprimer.com/howto then onto www.quik-build.com which is Adam Kalkin’s own site.

Another call to Germany to talk to Frankie our builder, who has already been involved in container conversion; he has got excited with the prospect too!

So using our original plans, there’s a possibility of creating the two dormitories, bathroom block and other living spaces with the containers – the possibilities are endless!   The whole container site would be covered by a roof that has solar panels; together with rainwater collection and possibly compost waste sanitation, we aim to be as green as possible.

We found an article about dry composting in Haiti after the earthquake that might be possible to use; we’re discussing it with a few experts in the subject currently: http://humanurehandbook.com/downloads/Public_Sanitation_Using_Hot_Composting.pdf

Now to find a friendly company ideally in Cote d’Ivoire who might want to help us out with finding containers so we can recycle them!  Or we’re back to the drawing board with bricks & mortar!

Bucket list

Cote d'Ivoire 2

As the Founder, I believe that I’m nowhere near kicking the bucket yet but on my bucket list I have to put a few ideals for CREER.

1.  CREER will have 30 children as a minimum

2.  That the centre will have small houses on the land for a few of the 17-18 year olds to start their road to independence.

3.  That our sustainable land will be flourishing & providing an income to keep CREER going in the long term

4. The children that have left will be in full-time employment or have set up their own businesses, no matter how small

5.  At least one of the children is working in an aviation related role (slightly biased here!)

But at the end of the day, if they’re all happy, healthy & being educated, that will be enough!

Children on the Move and the migration debate in development

Excellent piece on trafficking in Africa

Wait... What?

birds 2I spent the weekend working on a paper about “Children on the Move.” I’m not even close to done with it yet, but the topic is fascinating. Some reports say that 1/3 of migrants are between the ages of 12 and 25, including millions of children under the age of 18. The number of children and youth who migrate is difficult to pin down with certainty, given that migration is often within country, seasonal, across porous borders, and because most child migrants don’t have legal means to migrate or they lack identification, leaving them under the radar and uncounted.

Children move for all kinds of reasons, from and into all kinds of situations. The push-pull factors that cause them to migrate vary a great deal from situation to situation. Often the movement of children is lumped under trafficking and child labor, and all children who move are considered…

View original post 974 more words

Child Trafficking – Ever thought about it?

background-1

Too many children are trafficked in the modern world.  Slavery was abolished before our time but yet it continues.  Children are trafficked around the world to be used as slaves in one form or other.

Can you really let this continue?

When did you last check the origin of your chocolate, clothes etc?

Have you thought why trafficking happens?

Do you ever wonder what happens to those children?

Would you like to assist C.R.E.E.R assist these children?

Please help us to help them!

Why, where, what will C.R.E.E.R be?

CREER logo

C.R.E.E.R = Centre de Reinsertion et d’Education pour les Enfants de la Rue

(Centre of Reinsertion & Education for street children)

Cote d'Ivoire near the Ghana border

Why?

Some children are sold by their families for about US $60, believing that they will have a good life with an employer or promised that they will receive an education.

The families often need the money to manage the rest of the family.

Traffickers will sell these children onto farmers, domestic homes and brothels  offering children for US$200-US$250+.

Many of these children end up mentally and physically scarred from working  like bonded slaves; some will manage to runaway but live on the streets.

Why do families sell their children?

This video says it all, it’s why there are so many children coming from the Sahel belt; the Sahara encroaching on farmland; seeing it for yourself is startling, this video makes it all a bit more real

A farmer with dry land, how can he be expected to feed his family if the land isn’t sustainable?

It’s not just in Niger, but in Burkina Faso, Mali (where there’s more than just drought right now!)  and right across to Mauritania on the Atlantic coast where many West Africans are working for a pittance & slavery has only just been made illegal …

What makes it worse is when families such as these, share their food bowl with you; C.R.E.E.R’s founder has eaten with similar families.

So many are ‘forced’ to sell a child for US$60 or so, to pay for the rest of the family, buy necessary provisions or receive medical care.  The US$60 will go a long way for the family but the child who is sold will end up trafficked & working for others somewhere …

We all have to give back in abundance.  Our own way is to help the trafficked children in long-term rehabilitative care, providing an education to empower them out of this vicious cycle.

Read more here about the young girl’s legacy who gave the inspiration to create C.R.E.E.R http://wp.me/s3aqBS-17

Where?

C.R.E.E.R is to be a non-profit, non-political and non-religious centre in Abengourou, Cote d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast).   We expect a mix of Christians & Muslims as well as local religions; those that want to follow their faith can do so locally and will be taken to their place of worship by our staff.  We aim to work with the children, to give them future hope and be able to lead a normal adult life, after being part of a family at the centre.

Map of CI

What will C.R.E.E.R be?

As the first such designated centre in West Africa our aim is to give long-term rehabilitation for trafficked children from all over region that are being brought over the border for farming, domestic servitude & prostitution.

We’ve already talked to the immigration authorities.  The Ivorian Authorities are keen to see us set up as there’s nowhere that solely caters for trafficked children.  They house those that they can intercept at the border, wherever they can find a bed.  Our aim is to repatriate those that have families that can take care of them & educate the children that cannot be repatriated.

The idea is to create the centre as soon as possible.  C.R.E.E.R has worked hard since conception in 2010 before the Ivorian crisis and was unfortunately let down already regarding land with false promises in early 2011.

We aim to be as self-sufficient as possible, enabling the children to learn about animal husbandry as well as renewable energy sources and their maintenance.

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1.  We have been promised 5-hectares of land just over the border from Ghana in Cote d’Ivoire’s 10th largest town, Abengourou.  We will build the centre with single sex dormitories and workshops but to also create a small holding that the children will manage with tutors.

a)  The centre will provide accommodation for about 30 children initially.
b)  All children will receive an education, maths, French and also potentially English as core components of other subjects.

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2.  On the land we want to build workshops, this will be the vocational part of the project so that all children will have a chance to leave with a skill.

We hope some will further their education too in tertiary establishments.   The workshops will consist of vocational skills such as sewing, mechanics, carpentry and cooking etc.

We have a wonderful manager who is now ready to work with us, he has already managed an orphanage for several years & dearly missed by the children there.   He has held a variety of important meetings for C.R.E.E.R with government ministers.

We totally trust him & believe he will drive things forward in the interests of trafficked children.

In the longer term we’re hoping to have other C.R.E.E.R centres in Africa, the next one being at the other end of this trafficking corridor, just inside Nigeria’s border.

If you’d like to help, please email us at : c.r.e.e.r.rci@gmail.com

Or join our group http://www.facebook.com/groups/c.r.e.e.r.rci/

Or page http://www.facebook.com/pages/CREER/160911540628718 on Facebook

We’re also on Twitter @CREER_RCI

Please help us to get the first building at the centre constructed

(Thanks to ThirdEyeMom for the video & Sahel update: http://thirdeyemom.com/2013/02/26/starving-in-sahel-its-time-to-care)